Georgia Department of Agriculture

Plants Are Like People

Plants are like peopleSometimes a plant grows on you.  Not literally, of course. 

For example, several years ago I purchased a ‘Challenger’ daylily because it was taller and bloomed later than other daylilies. When it bloomed I was disappointed.  The flowers were not as intensely red as the photograph in the catalog, and the petals were not as thin and “spidery” as I had hoped.

It was tall, however, rising to five feet or more, and extended my daylily season by beginning to bloom weeks after my other daylilies.  I decided to keep it around a while longer instead of immediately casting it out of my little Eden. 

I am glad I did; ‘Challenger’ has proven its worth.  It wasn’t exactly what I expected, but now I am quite fond of it.

I was ready to dig up and give away the citron daylily (Hemerocalllis citrina) because the fragrance wasn’t as nice as I had been led to believe.  Then I began to appreciate the slender grace of the stems and flowers and the fact that the flowers opened in the evening instead of in the morning like other daylilies.

Have you done this with plants as well, dismissing them without taking the time to learn their virtues?  Unfortunately, I have also treated people that way.  I’m trying to do a better job giving plants and people a fair chance.

                                                                                                                                                                       -- Arty Schronce

Arty Schronce lives and gardens in the historic Cabbagetown neighborhood of Atlanta. He encourages everyone to discover the pleasures of plants and gardening.

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